Actor

Tobin Bell Phone Number, Fanmail Address, Email Id and Contact Details

Want to talk to Tobin Bell over the phone number and look for Tobin Bell’s email and fanmail address? Yes, you are in the right place! You will get the contact information of Tobin Bell’s phone number, email address, and fan mail address details.

Tobin Bell Bio

Tobin Bell is a well-known American actor who was given birth to Joseph Henry Tobin Jr. on August 7, 1942. His role as John Kramer/Jigsaw in the Saw franchise is the one that has brought him the most fame, despite the fact that he has acted in a lot of films and television shows. Beginning in the late 1970s and continuing into the early 1980s, he began his acting career by performing stand-in and background work on feature films.

In 1988’s Mississippi Burning, which was his debut in the film industry, he played a role. Bell had roles in a variety of films and television shows during the 1990s and 2000s, including The Firm (1993), Unabomber: The True Story (1996), Walker, Texas Ranger (1998), and the early seasons of The Sopranos (2001) and 24 (2003). His breakthrough performance occurred the next year, in 2004, when he was cast in the part of Jigsaw, the serial killer, in the film Saw (2004).

The movie was a commercial success, and actor Tobin Bell went on to play the role in nine of the ten sequels that followed it. These include Saw II (2005), Saw III (2006), Saw IV (2007), Saw V (2008), Saw VI (2009), Saw 3D (2010), Jigsaw (2017), and the upcoming Saw X (2023). As a result of the success of the series, which has helped establish Bell as a leading figure in the horror genre, it has become one of the highest-grossing horror franchises of all time. Joseph Henry Tobin Jr. was born in Queens, New York on August 7, 1942, however, he spent the majority of his childhood in Weymouth, Massachusetts.

His mother was an actress who worked at the Quincy Repertory Company. Her name was Eileen Julia Bell Tobin, and she came from England. His father, Joseph H. Tobin, was born in the United States and ran for mayor of Gloversville, New York at one point in his life. In 1947, he constructed and launched the radio station WJDA in Quincy, Massachusetts. There is one brother and one sister in his family.

During his time in college, Bell focused on liberal arts as well as journalism with the goal of one day becoming a writer and working in the profession of radio. He holds a master’s degree in environmental science from Montclair State University and has worked for the New York Botanical Garden, indicating that he is likewise interested in issues pertaining to the environment. He attributes his decision to launch a career in acting to the fact that he attended a class at Boston University that was given by Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn.

Later on, Bell became a member of the Actors Studio and studied acting under the tutelage of Lee Strasberg and Ellen Burstyn. He also became a member of Sanford Meisner’s Neighborhood Playhouse. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, Bell appeared in supporting roles in over 30 films, including Woody Allen’s Manhattan (1979), in addition to playing on off-Broadway and off-off-Broadway stages. Bell stated that other performers at the Performers Studio believed that working as a stand-in or in the background was “stupid or degrading,” but he believed the opposite to be true.

In the film Tootsie that Sydney Pollack directed in 1982, he played a waiter at the Russian Tea Room in an uncredited scene that Pollack used as a tracking shot. The film was directed by Pollack. He told Movieline, “You know when you’re talking about Tootsie, it’s the tip of the iceberg because those other twenty-nine films I did aren’t even on IMDb.” He was referring to the fact that his earlier films are not even listed on the IMDb database.

During the filming of The Verdict (1982), he served as a courtroom reporter for two weeks during the trial. He recalled that it was a “great opportunity” to study the technical aspects of acting while also observing Sidney Lumet and Paul Newman in action, and he recalled that it was during this time. He maintains a notebook for each of the roles that he performs, beginning with the first reading of the script and continuing until the last shot of production, in which he records a variety of questions about his character as well as the motivations that drive him. “I write all different kinds of things, including stream-of-consciousness stuff, that helps me.”

In the film Svengali from 1983, he made his debut as a waiter with three lines of dialogue. This was his first speaking role. In the same year, Bell had a little part as a reporter in the drama Sophie’s Choice, in which she had a speaking role. Bell stated in the middle of the 1980s, “I was doing off-Broadway plays three nights a week, working on my craft.” And a director working at the Actors Studio commented, “You know, Tobin, you’ve been doing that for a while. I think you’d be perfect for one of those bad guy roles in Hollywood.'” After moving to Los Angeles, Bell was cast in his first feature picture, Mississippi Burning, in 1988, playing the role of FBI Agent Stokes, who was described as “tough and street smart.”

In 1993, Bell was given the role of an assassin known as “The Nordic Man” in another film directed by Pollack called The Firm. In the same year, he played Mendoza in the movie “In the Line of Fire,” in which he tried to provoke an undercover version of Clint Eastwood into demonstrating his allegiance by killing his colleague, who was portrayed by Dylan McDermott. After that, he was a guest star on an episode of Seinfeld called “The Old Man,” in which he played the role of a record store proprietor. During the 1993 and 1996 seasons of NYPD Blue, he guest-starred in a variety of roles in a pair of episodes.

In the second episode of the first season of ER, which aired in 1994, Bell portrayed a hospital administrator. After that, he went on to feature in an episode of another medical drama called Chicago Hope, where he played a terminally sick convict on death row. In the same year, he played the role of Ted Kaczynski in the television movie Unabomber: The True Story. In 1997, Bell appeared as a guest star in episodes of the television shows La Femme Nikita and Nash Bridges.

The year after that, he had a recurring role on an episode of Stargate SG-1 and a guest-starring role on Walker, Texas Ranger over the course of two episodes. In the episode “Army of One” from 2001 of “The Sopranos,” in which Bell played the role of Major Carl Zwingli, Bell appeared in only one scene. In the second season of 24, which aired in 2003, he was cast in the role of the antagonist Peter Kingsley.

2004–2010: Played a role that led to his debut and became a horror icon In 2003, Bell was given the role of John Kramer/Jigsaw in the horror thriller Saw, which is considered to be his breakout performance. The story of the movie centers on John Kramer, a former engineer turned serial killer who believes that others may be taught the value of life by subjecting them to depraved “games” that involve both physical and mental torment.

James Wan made his debut as a filmmaker with this movie, which was shot over the course of 18 days with a budget of $1.2 million. Bell’s part was essential to the movie despite the fact that he spent two weeks lying on the floor and had very few lines of dialogue. He credits the opportunity to work with Danny Glover for the first time and the fact that he thought the film’s ending was really good as the primary reasons he decided to participate in the project.

In the days leading up to the film’s premiere at the 2004 Sundance Film Festival, Lionsgate was able to secure the rights to distribute it all over the world. In spite of the fact that it was going to be released directly to video at first, favorable feedback from test screenings in March convinced Lionsgate to release it in theaters on Halloween of that same year. It was a commercial success, bringing in 103 million dollars around the world, but garnering criticism of varying quality from reviewers. Despite the fact that Bell would join the first picture with no intention of there ever being a second film made, as a direct result of the financial success of the first film, six direct sequels were released on the first of every month between October 2005 and October 2010, including the first film.

Tobin Bell Phone Number, Fanmail Address, Email Id, and Contact Details
Whatsapp No. NA
Twitter https://twitter.com/officialtobin
Youtube Channel NA
Snapchat NA
Phone Number (858) 273-7745
Official Website NA
Office Number NA
Office address NA
LinkedIn NA
Instagram https://www.instagram.com/tobinbellofficial/
House address (Residence address) Queens, New York, United States
Facebook Id NA
Email Address NA

Tobin Bell Fanmail Address

Tobin Bell
Lion’s Road Productions, Inc.
PO Box 578
Malibu, CA 90265
USA

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Tobin Bell Phone Number 2023- This post contains a phone number, house address, and Fan mailing address to request autographs and send fan mail letters to Tobin Bell. If you want to get an autograph from Tobin Bell, you can send your handwritten letter to the above address (with a size of 8.5 x 4 inches.) Please wait up to 3 months. If there is no reply, resend your letter or exchange it with another address.


How can you send a celeb fan mail or a signature request?

Follow the instructions and criteria below to request an autograph from your favorite celebrities by sending a fan mail.

1st step

If you live in the United Kingdom or the United States, include your request letter, a photo or poster, and a properly stamped and self-addressed envelope.

(Envelopes should be 8.5″ x 4″ in size.)

2nd Step

You must purchase a British stamp if you do not live in the United Kingdom.

3rd step

You can include a piece of cardboard to keep the photo from bending during mailing by writing “Do Not Bend” above the envelope sent.

4th step

Send your letter to your favorite celebrity at the mentioned address and wait.

5th step

Responses sometimes take a long time to arrive. An answer would take three to five months on average or perhaps longer.

Also Check: Laura Veirs’s Phone Number, Fanmail Address, Email Id, and Contact Details

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